About SCTA

The Sonoma County Transportation Authority (SCTA) was created in 1990 and is governed by a twelve-member Board of Directors representing each of the nine cities - Cloverdale, Cotati, Healdsburg, Petaluma, Rohnert Park, Santa Rosa, Sebastopol, Sonoma and Windsor - and the Sonoma County board of Supervisors. The SCTA acts as the countywide planning and fund programming agency for transportation and performs a variety of important functions related to advocacy, project management, planning, finance, grant administration and research.

The SCTA coordinates the activities of local jurisdictions with regional, state and federal entities at both a policy and administrative level. As a coordination agency, the SCTA provides a forum for local elected officials to engage in dialog on countywide issues and enables discussions among local and regional entities on a wide range of issues that link to the movement of people and goods, program management and project delivery.

Transportation Funding and Planning

The SCTA was formed as a result of federal and State legislation to address regional planning and funding matters. In 2004, the SCTA responsibilities expanded to include management of the Measure M sales tax program – a voter approved ¼ cent sales tax that generates about $20M annually for transportation purposes.

The SCTA is responsible for managing Measure M funds and prioritizing most state and federal funds available to Sonoma County for roadway, transit, bicycle and pedestrian projects. The SCTA serves as the entity responsible for planning and prioritizing transportation improvement projects at a countywide level and provides project management in partnership with Caltrans on the State Highway system.

The same Board of Directors also coordinates countywide climate protection activities through its other role as the Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA).

SCTA Mission

As a collaborative agency of the cities and County of Sonoma, we work together to maintain and improve our transportation network. We do so by prioritizing, coordinating, and maximizing the funding available to us and providing comprehensive, county­wide planning. Our deliberations and decisions recognize the diverse needs within our county and the environmental and economic aspects of transportation planning.

Did you know?

Bott’s Dots

You see these round lane-makers every day. They were invented by Dr. Elbert Dysart Botts (a CalTrans engineer) and mandated in 1966 for all state highways outside of areas with snowfall. They were originally mounted on the road with nails, but CalTrans switched to epoxy after broken dots started causing flat tires.